Monday, July 6, 2020

Glocalisation is a term signifying the mixing of global and local themes to develop viable solutions. The term has become increasingly important over the years. Though mostly used in development communication it has significant importance in today’s technology driven journalism where the boundaries between the local and the global have been blurring every passing day. Brexit and Donald Trump might have been just news, soft news, 10 years earlier. The German elections might not have had any news significant importance in the Pakistani media. In the same vein Pakistani politics might have remained a backbench theme in international media. The Rohingya tragedy, boat people, and many similar themes are being seen globally, or should be seen globally, because the world has shrunk enormously.

All these stories have a political flare. There are also other themes that have a larger futuristic impact globally. Environment, ecology, and their rising global importance are themes that remain outside the parameters of either the local or the global understanding at a par with the needs of the time. Similarly issues of human rights, justice, equality, immigration, and many other globally relevant but locally important themes need to be addressed in a newer light.

This asks for an approach where local perspectives are drawn, keeping in view the global perspectives; and vice versa. How could a global approach to human rights be useful, unless it takes into account the exact local perspective of the people, place under discussion? In the same way how could we seek a local solution to a problem of immigration while not discussing the current global perspective on the topic. World events don’t need a historical dimension to be explained. The present itself is presenting so many problems and potentials that doing justice to these is becoming an art in its own right.

This page strives to add to these skills and present ideas that could help and deeper and more humane understanding of human situations. One of the leading themes would remain peace through journalism. This is because of the fact that we are living in an increasingly hostile world. The war of words has an enormous potential to become a flaring inferno devouring human lives. Journalism has a responsibility to seek peace and bolster justice. In the words of one of the few rightful winners of the Nobel Peace Prize, Martin Luther King Jr. Peace is not the absence of conflict, it is in fact the presence of justice.

We seek justice through empowering people. And empowering people is not the work of enhanced rhetoric. It is through offering them useful information to empower them in their decision making processes. This is the work of a journalist. Supporting the local needs of decision making and striving for developing a deeper understanding of democratic processes, which, in turn, will support the much needed understanding of a universal democracy.

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